Being a refugee

There are a lot of white supremacists in the U.S. Not every white person is one, of course, and not every Trump voter or Republican is one, not by a long shot, but there are definitely a few of them out there, and some belong to organized groups that do recruitment, have weapons, and do “survival” training and that kind of thing. I have met American white supremacists before, and I found them creepy, scary, and disturbing, even though I am white. I am certain that people who are not white find them even more threatening and scary than I do.

If I lived in, say, Afghanistan, I would probably meet more radical islamic jihadists, and would feel the same way about them, but in the U.S. I think it’s safe to say that the white supremacists outnumber the radical islamic jihadists by a fairly large number.

White supremacists are not innocuous; they have engaged in significant terrorist activity over the years. In Europe, for instance, white supremacists were responsible for the deaths of millions of people, and have caused considerable terror in the U.S. with lynchings, cross-burnings, and worse over the years. There have also been more recent examples of white supremacist terrorism, in Quebec City, in Norway, in Germany, and in the U.S. Even today, people like Bannon and his Breitbart Media as well as Putin have been supporting far-right groups in Europe, fanning the flames, possibly with the goal of breaking up the EU. The side effect that stirring up these groups might cause some of their followers to commit violent acts – and they have. They tend to be against “the Government” – at least against established democratic government that allows everyone to vote.

Imagine what if …

one of these far-right white supremacist groups started a civil war in the U.S., maybe with support from the Russians or Chinese or both. If they were intent on destroying the government and taking over, they would attack some big U.S. cities in order to destabilize the country, making them unsafe to live in.

Now, imagine that you live in one of these cities under siege, with your family, with grandparents, parents, your siblings, and your children. Your children are afraid go to school, you can’t go to work, and even going to the grocery store risks your life if you run into a band of supremacists, or get caught between them and the remaining U.S. military or the militant left that sprung up to fight the white supremacists. You don’t care who is shooting at you, you don’t care about politics, you just want your family to be safe and live a normal life.

After your brother is killed while trying to find food, you decide to take your family out of the country and escape to somewhere else. The closest safe places are Mexico and Canada, and both countries are already so overrun by U.S. refugees that they have to house them in tents, and are reluctant to welcome more. Who could blame them? The refugees cause a great strain on their systems, and although they keep asking the rest of the world to share the burden, most countries are reluctant to do very much.

Adding to the resentment, Mexicans dislike Americans ever since the Wall was built, and Canada is not much better, you’ve heard, ever since some white supremacists groups based in the U.S. tried to take over the country. You know that whatever you decide, it will be miserable until you can get asylum somewhere else, but you don’t have much choice. You decide to chance Mexico because Canada can get pretty cold when you’re staying in a tent. So you and your family pack only the bare necessities, sell everything you can so have some cash for the trip, and make the dangerous journey to Mexico, dodging white supremacist strongholds and paying a coyote a big chunk of your cash to get you all over the Wall.

Once you are in Mexico, you and your family are detained in a camp with inadequate sanitation and little privacy while you wait for your family to be vetted and granted asylum somewhere. Some of the guards are compassionate, but others mistreat you for no other reason than being white. Still, at least you aren’t dodging bullets every day, so it’s an improvement and you are grateful to be alive.

You stay in the camp for many months, and finally, after more than a year of waiting, you are granted asylum in India, which has been known in recent years for welcoming immigrants and refugees to help with their economic expansion even though the recently voted President seems anti-white and promised during his campaign to ban white people from entering the country. You don’t really believe this will happen, since politicians from his party often use such rhetoric in their campaigns without acting on it. You pack up the little you have left, buy plane tickets for your family with the last of your cash, which you miraculously managed to hang on to, and go to the airport, excited and thrilled to be able to start a new life at last.

Just as you are about to board the plane, you are taken out of the line and told that you are not allowed to travel. Why? Well, India has suddenly decided to ban all travel from the U.S., citing national security concerns. You don’t understand; white supremacists have been more active in Europe lately, attacking targets in North Africa, but none of those attackers were Americans. The new president is simply making good on his campaign promise. They may eventually let some U.S. refugees in again, but non-whites and especially Asians will have preference, since they are more at risk from the white supremacists.

In the past, refugees like you would have been somewhat protected by international treaties such as the Geneva Refugee Conventions, but ever since the U.S. chose to withdraw from international cooperation in the first half of the 21st century, ignoring treaties and conventions, the leadership role in international relations ended up going to the Chinese and Russians. Without some of its strongest champions – for Europe and England fell to the white supremacists just like the U.S. did – the cause of human rights has become a footnote to history.

Imagine how you would feel if that happened to you. How do you feel about the refugee ban now?